VDC to supply display units for US Army common driver trainers

25 November 2013 (Last Updated November 25th, 2013 18:30)

Video Display Corporation (VDC) has received a contract from Raydon to supply the video display units (VDU) for use in the US Army's common driver trainer (CDT) systems.

Strker CDT system

Video Display Corporation (VDC) has received a contract from Raydon to supply the video display units (VDU) for use in the US Army's common driver trainer (CDT) systems.

Under the contract, VDC Display Systems (VDCDS) will supply a high resolution visual display system for installation in CDT systems that Raydon is developing as part of a $40m contract received in May 2013

Awarded by the US Army Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training and Instrumentation (PEO STRI), the multi-year contract covers delivery of CDT systems for tactical wheeled vehicle variants, mine-resistant ambush protected (MRAP) mobile and fixed systems, as well as tank engineering vehicle variants.

When integrated with CDT, the HRVDS can replicate real world scenarios executing mission procedures in a tactical environment under normal and degraded conditions.

"VDC Display Systems' extensive design and manufacturing experience of visual display systems play a critical role."

Video Display Corporation's CEO and chairman, Ron Ordway, said: ''The inclusion of our display system in this program is a prime example of the growing need for low cost high resolution display solutions in which VDC Display Systems' extensive design and manufacturing experience of visual display systems play a critical role."

Comprising a simulated vehicle cab, instructor / operator station, after action review (AAR) station, visual system, six-degrees-of-freedom motion system and a computational system, the CDT is designed to provide initial and sustainment driver training at operational units and training installations for the Stryker, Abrams main battle tanks (MBTs) and MRAP family of vehicles.

Specifically, Raydon's system is expected to train soldiers in the operation of the combat vehicles being fielded to Fort Leonard Wood in Missouri, US, and to bases in both Korea and Japan, apart from serving as a technical refresh to current CDT systems fielded across the US.

The contract's value and delivery schedule remain undisclosed.


Image: a common driver trainer for the US Army's Stryker vehicles at Fort Lewis in Washington, US. Photo: courtesy of Jason Kaye.

Defence Technology