Lockheed’s DAGR missile demonstrates ground vehicle launch capabilities

24 February 2013 (Last Updated February 24th, 2013 18:30)

Lockheed Martin's direct attack guided rocket (DAGR) missile has successfully demonstrated its ability to launch from a ground vehicle during a series of test flights at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, US.

DAGR missile

Lockheed Martin's direct attack guided rocket (DAGR) missile has successfully demonstrated its ability to launch from a ground vehicle during a series of test flights at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, US.

During testing, a DAGR missile and two unguided Hydra 70 rockets were launched from a pedestal launcher that was mounted in the bed of a company's Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) prototype.

"DAGR delivers a high-precision defensive capability to the surface combat arena when paired with the pedestal launcher and a mobile ground platform like the JLTV."

The missile flew 5km down range after locking onto the laser spot two seconds following launch, and hit the intended target within 1m of the spot.

Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control close combat systems director Ken Musculus said: "DAGR delivers a high-precision defensive capability to the surface combat arena when paired with the pedestal launcher and a mobile ground platform like the JLTV."

The Hydra 70 rockets also travelled 521m and 2,600m respectively, following launch down the centre of the range by the pedestal launcher that features four M299 launcher rails, associated cables and electronics and possesses full-compatibility with Hellfire II and DAGR missiles.

DAGR is a 2.75in/70mm precision-strike, air-to-ground weapon to destroy non-armoured or lightly armoured, high-value targets located close to civilian assets or friendly forces with minimum collateral damage.

Fully compatible with Hellfire II laser guided missiles, the DAGR offers lock-on-after-launch (LOAL) and lock-on-before-launch (LOBL) capabilities, target handoff, enhanced built-in testing on the rail, and laser coding from the cockpit, enabling pilots to efficiently pursue offset targets.

Capable of launching from legacy or modified M260/M261 launchers, the missile completed 40 flight tests from ranges of 1km to 5.1km to date, following launch from multiple Hellfire-equipped rotary-wing platforms, including the AH-64D Apache, AH-6 Little Bird and OH-58 Kiowa Warrior helicopters.


Image: A direct attack-guided rocket missile during testing at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, US. Photo: courtesy of B4Ctom1.

Defence Technology