US Army units conduct live-fire M58 MICLIC range

15 June 2018 (Last Updated June 15th, 2018 13:44)

Idaho Army National Guard's 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion has carried out live-fire M58 mine clearing line charge (MICLIC) training in collaboration with the US Army Reserve's 321st Engineer Battalion.

US Army units conduct live-fire M58 MICLIC range
A live-fire M58 mine clearing line charge (MICLIC) range. Credit: Spc Jonnie Riley.

Idaho Army National Guard’s 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion has carried out live-fire M58 mine clearing line charge (MICLIC) training in collaboration with the US Army Reserve’s 321st Engineer Battalion.

The trial was conducted at the Orchard Combat Training Center, Boise, Idaho. Both teams are supporting the 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team’s exportable Combat Training Capability rotation.

Combat engineers use MICLIC rocket-projected explosive line charges to clear a path in order to enable an M1A2 Abrams main battle tank to pass through 100m-long obstacles or minefields.

A rocket propels a 100m cable downrange, while carrying approximately 2,000lb of heavy explosives.

However, the rounds of the two army units did not include explosives during the training range.

"Joint training such as this is beneficial to all combat engineers because we share the wartime mission of supporting armoured brigade combat teams."

The two engineer battalions belong to different components and use varied platforms to fire the MICLICs.

116th Brigade Engineer Battalion commander lieutenant colonel Lee Rubel said: “Engineers are engineers. MICLIC training between National Guard and Army Reserve elements is the same. Joint training such as this is beneficial to all combat engineers because we share the wartime mission of supporting armoured brigade combat teams.”

During the live-fire test, the Idaho Army National Guard’s 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion fired the MICLIC platform from the Assault Breacher Vehicle. This is also capable of proofing and marking a lane for manoeuvre forces to follow using a two-soldier crew.

Headquartered in Boise, the Army Reserve’s 321st Engineer Battalion used an M60 Armoured Vehicle Launched Mine Clearing Line Charge (AVLM) to fire the weapon system, which is a M60 Armored Vehicle Launched Bridge (ABLV) with the bridge downloaded.

The weapon system is mounted to the vehicle with the deployment of the bridge.