Raytheon to demonstrate FoXTEN mobile intelligence platform

16 April 2018 (Last Updated April 16th, 2018 11:31)

The US Army has awarded a contract to Raytheon for the demonstration of its commercially available mobile intelligence platform to provide soldiers access to real-time data on the battlefield.

Raytheon to demonstrate FoXTEN mobile intelligence platform
Distributed Common Ground System. Credit: US Air Force.

The US Army has awarded a contract to Raytheon for the demonstration of its commercially available mobile intelligence platform to provide soldiers access to real-time data on the battlefield.

Awarded by the US Army Contracting Command, the new contract will see Raytheon demonstrate its new FoXTEN software product that could be selected to serve as a future mobile component of the army’s distributed common ground system (DCGS).

The US Army is currently upgrading its existing DCGS system, including the mobile intelligence platform.

The army’s DCGS is designed as an intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) system that produces intelligence information from multiple sources and sensors.

“The US Army will carry out a series of operational tests of the FoXTEN software over the next year before making a final procurement decision.”

Raytheon Intelligence, Information and Services mission support and modernisation vice-president Todd Probert said: “Our soldiers need real-time access to intelligence and surveillance data, and FoXTEN is designed to get that information to and from the most remote edges of the battlefield.

“We’ll be bringing our deep experience integrating the best commercial software into a system our soldiers can trust to keep them constantly aware of threats and give them the advantage they need to win on any battlefield.”

The FoXTEN software product is said to support mission decision-making across all battle domains by providing soldiers with real-time intelligence information collected from various sources.

The Raytheon laptop-based platform is lightweight, requires less power and can work at low transmission speeds.

Probert added: “Our system is intuitive, easy-to-use and only takes eight hours of training compared to the current system.”

The US Army will carry out a series of operational tests of the FoXTEN software over the next year before making a final procurement decision.