US Army range shot detection system completes government testing

11 January 2013 (Last Updated January 11th, 2013 03:50)

The US Army's new location of miss and hit (LOMAH) system has successfully completed government acceptance testing (GAT) at Fort Benning in Georgia, and Fort Leonard Wood in Missouri.

LOMAH system

The US Army's new location of miss and hit (LOMAH) system has successfully completed government acceptance testing (GAT) at Fort Benning in Georgia, and Fort Leonard Wood in Missouri.

Conducted by active-duty platoon from Charlie Troop, 3rd Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, the testing demonstrated the system's ability to detect hits and misses for targets at 75m, 175m and 300m.

During testing, the system was used to conduct three marksmanship tasks, including grouping and zeroing at distance, practicing qualification and qualification against using three different ranges to complete zeroing task at 25m, and also to confirm zero at distance and qualifying on one range.

The tasks were carried out using standard qualification targets, unlike previous instances where they would require three days and three ranges for accomplishment.

"We first created it for Roscosmos. Now we hope the military will be interested as well."

Joint Base Langley-Eustis Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) Capability Manager-Live Targetry Development team chief Matt Golden said the system would enhance the soldier's shooting skills by providing immediate feedback.

"LOMAH will save time by allowing soldiers to qualify more quickly," Golden added.

Developed by US Army Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training and Instrumentation (PE0 STRI) Project Manager for Training Devices, the LOMAH is a projectile detection targetry system designed to support basic rifle marksmanship training by tracking rounds fired on or near targets.

Using acoustic sensors, the system detects hits or misses on or within a 2m radius of a target, and transmits the results to an Android-based tablet at the firing point, automatically triangulating the shot group to deliver corrective data to the shooter.

Suited for advanced rifle marksmanship, the system is primarily designed for both the M16 rifle and the M4 carbine featuring iron sights, back-up iron sights, close-combat optic, as well as advanced combat optical gun sights.

The system is scheduled to be deployed at Fort Jackson in South Carolina, US, in 2013.


Image: A US trooper using the new location of miss and hit system during GAT at Fort Benning in Georgia, US. Photo: courtesy of US Army.