Australian Army completes final phase of Plan Beersheba

6 November 2017 (Last Updated November 6th, 2017 11:46)

The Australian Army has completed the final phase of its restructuring programme, Plan Beersheba.

Australian Army completes final phase of Plan Beersheba
Craftsman Jordan Hallett from the 2nd/14th Light Horse Regiment salutes during the Freedom of Entry March into Brisbane City. Credit: © Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence.

The Australian Army has completed the final phase of its restructuring programme, Plan Beersheba.

Launched in 2011, Plan Beersheba’s primary goal was to keep the army equipped and prepared for new and emerging threats.

Under the initiative, the army’s three regular force combat brigades were restructured into multi-role formations with a similar structure.

The army marked the final phase of the rollout of more than 65 armoured military vehicles and three new M1A1 Abrams main battle tanks in support of the 7th Brigade at Enoggera Barracks.

Australian Army chief lieutenant general Angus Campbell said: “Army now has three commonly structured brigades in Darwin/Adelaide (1 Brigade), Townsville (3 Brigade) and Brisbane (7 Brigade) to enhance our capability to sustain our forces deployed on operations.

“The changes delivered through this plan have established foundations to ensure that as the army moves forward we will continue to be a modern, connected and technologically advanced force.”

“These three brigades are supported by the six brigades of Army’s 2nd Division (reserves), 16th Brigade (Aviation), 17th Combat Service Support Brigade (Logistics), 6th Combat Support Brigade (Intelligence and Surveillance) and Special Forces.”

The plan also included integrating regular and reserve personnel into one total workforce of approximately 45,000 people.

A specialist amphibious infantry battalion, 2nd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, was developed to provide pre-landing force support to ground combat units embarked on HMA Ships Adelaide, Canberra, and Choules, in order to further contribute to the Australian Defence Force (ADF) amphibious capability.

The newly introduced three-year cycle for improved training and management of army personnel aims to ensure soldiers are better prepared for operations in future.

Campbell added: “The changes delivered through this plan have established foundations to ensure that as the army moves forward we will continue to be a modern, connected and technologically advanced force.”