PacStar begins FRP of 400-Series SFF modules for US T2C2 systems

24 January 2018 (Last Updated January 24th, 2018 12:33)

The US Army has authorised the full rate production (FRP) of PacStar’s 400-Series small form factor (SFF) tactical and deployable communications modules.

PacStar begins FRP of 400-Series SFF modules for US T2C2 systems
The transportable tactical command communications (T2C2) heavy satellite terminal. Credit: US Army photo by Amy Walker, PEO C3T Public Affairs

The US Army has authorised the full rate production (FRP) of PacStar’s 400-Series small form factor (SFF) tactical and deployable communications modules.

The modules will be used for the army’s transportable tactical command communications (T2C2) programme, which will feature two variants, a soldier-portable T2C2 Lite for early entry forces and a T2C2 Heavy for company-level command post / forward operating base communications.

The PacStar equipment can be used to provide baseband networking for the T2C2 Lite and Heavy systems.

PacStar chief executive officer Peggy Miller said: “The US Army’s selection of PacStar for the T2C2 programme validates the savings in SWaP (size, weight and power) and modularity of our designs.

“It also underscores our commitment to quality, responsive technical support and significant investment in ongoing product advancement.”

“Together with T2C2 satellite terminals, the modules will facilitate access to the US Army’s tactical communications network for the early entry forces.”

The SFF communications modules have successfully completed operational testing with the US Army’s 4th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson.

Together with T2C2 satellite terminals, the modules will facilitate access to the US Army’s tactical communications network for the early entry forces.

Featuring a snap-together design, the company’s baseband system comprises routing, switching and servers based on the PacStar 400-series solutions.

It integrates Cisco networking and switching technologies and Intel advanced processors in rugged, small form factor modules. This design enables multiple modules to share power from a common set of rechargeable batteries.

According to the company, the components and modules are designed to be completely interchangeable across the light and heavy variants. This helps to decrease training time, increase logistics and optimise flexibility while supporting the programme’s growth and development.

The US Army intends to procure T2C2 until early 2025 and expects to deploy T2C2 to 15 army operational elements this year.