North Carolina Army National Guard performs airborne operations

22 June 2020 (Last Updated June 22nd, 2020 11:39)

The North Carolina Army National Guard, the principal military force of the US state, has carried out static-line airborne operations at the Stanley County Regional Airport.

North Carolina Army National Guard performs airborne operations
North Carolina Army National Guard Soldiers from three units conducted airborne operations at the Stanley County Regional Airport. Credit: US Army.

The North Carolina Army National Guard, the principal military force of the US state, has carried out static-line airborne operations at the Stanley County Regional Airport.

The exercise was part of its preparations for the upcoming hurricane season as well as for other humanitarian efforts.

The 403rd Quartermaster Rigger Support Team and B Company, 3rd Battalion, 20th Special Forces Group participated in the exercise.

A Black Hawk helicopter team from the 449th Theater Aviation Brigade supported the three units to conduct the operations.

In a static-line jump, the parachute is attached to the aircraft with webbing material and its opens automatically when the soldier jumps out of the helicopter.

Formed less than three years ago, the 403rd Rigger Support Team includes parachute riggers and jumpmasters, and supports other NC Guard units.

The introduction of the rigger support team helped North Carolina in reducing the procurement of High-Altitude, Low-Opening (HALO) parachutes through outsourcing channels.

Sergeant Richard Barath, the training non-commissioned officer for the rigger support team, said: “As long as we are proficient, we’re able to pack and provide chutes for the airborne community.

“It also allows us to maintain proficiencies in rigging supplies for possible humanitarian efforts.”

403rd parachute rigger Specialist Jeremy Lamber said: “Being able to do this in-house provides a closer network for units who need to maintain their airborne status and proficiency.

“Previously, HALO chutes were coming from out of state, and now they’re going to be able to be provided in-state.”