Rockwell contracted to provide support for US Army’s CH-47F avionics

20 November 2016 (Last Updated November 20th, 2016 18:30)

Rockwell Collins has secured a contract to provide service and support to common avionics architecture system (CAAS) on the US Army’s CH-47F helicopter fleet.

Rockwell contracted to provide support for US Army’s CH-47F avionics

Rockwell Collins has secured a contract to provide services and support to common avionics architecture systems (CAAS) on the US Army’s CH-47F helicopter fleet.

Under the contract, the company will service up to 1,910 CAAS units by the end of 2021.

The contract requires Rockwell Collins to provide fixed-price repairs to avionics management systems over the next five years.

The company said that CAAS integrates multiple communications, navigation and mission subsystems through its flexible Flight2 open systems architecture design.

Rockwell Collins service solutions vice-president and general manager Thierry Tosi said: “Since its original installation, CAAS continues to enable army aviation to safely perform highly demanding missions worldwide.

"Since its original installation, CAAS continues to enable army aviation to safely perform highly demanding missions worldwide.”

“With this service contract, we’re providing lifetime value to the US Army by sustaining and supporting these mission critical avionics. Supporting this contract keeps CH-47F helicopters flying so soldiers can accomplish their missions.”

Originally fielded on the CH-47F aircraft in 2007, Rockwell Collins’ CAAS features cockpit displays that are optimised for cargo, assault and multi-mission roles.

It also includes integrated map and tactical displays for improved battlefield survivability and mission effectiveness, Rockwell said in a statement.

The CAAS was initially developed for the Special Operations Forces' MH-47 and MH-60 helicopter fleets.

US forces have also selected the avionics management system for the MH-60T, MH-65E, VH-60N and CH-53K helicopters.


Image: Rockwell Collins selected to support cockpit equipment for US Army CH-47F. Photo: courtesy of Rockwell Collins.