Lockheed completes WCSP’s preliminary design review

30 January 2014 (Last Updated January 30th, 2014 18:30)

Lockheed Martin UK has successfully completed preliminary design review (PDR) in the Warrior capability sustainment programme (WCSP), marking a significant milestone in the upgrade of the UK army's major infantry fighting vehicle (AFV).

Warrior vehicle

Lockheed Martin UK has successfully completed preliminary design review (PDR) in the Warrior capability sustainment programme (WCSP), marking a significant milestone in the upgrade of the UK army's major infantry fighting vehicle (AFV).

The milestone follows the successful completion of the system architecture design review (SADR).

The PDR completion was a result of several months of cooperative development between the UK Ministry of Defence's (MoD) defence equipment and support (DE&S) armoured vehicle programme, the company and its team of high-quality suppliers who together have matured the vehicle design, its sub-systems, character and performance attributes.

Lockheed Martin UK-Ampthill vice-president and managing director Alan Lines said: "We have completed another significant stage in our mission to deliver the future armoured core of the UK army.

"The vehicle was deployed during Operation Desert Storm and 2003 Iraq conflict, as well as in support of UN missions in Bosnia and Afghanistan."

''This latest success reflects the dedication, commitment and resilience shown by every member of the WCSP team.''

Valued at £1bn, the WCSP is designed to enhance the Warrior AFV fleet's combat capabilities and survivability to help extend its out-of-service date (OSD) to beyond 2040.

Lockheed received a £642m contract from the MoD in October 2011, to perform a range of upgrades and enhancements on the existing vehicle, including integration of a stabilised CT40 cannon with a modern digital fire-control system, open electronic architecture (EA) and improved armour protection with significant cost-savings.

Led by Lockheed, the Warrior transformation team (WTT) includes Ultra Electronics, Defence Support Group, SCISYS, Rheinmetall Defence, Curtiss Wright, Thales UK, Moog, Meggitt, CTA International, Jenoptik and Elbit Systems Kinetics.

Powered by a Perkins V-8 Condor diesel engine, the Warrior tracked vehicle has been designed to replace the UK army's ageing FV430 series of armoured vehicles, which were built in the 1980s.

The vehicle was deployed during Operation Desert Storm and 2003 Iraq conflict, as well as in support of UN missions in Bosnia and Afghanistan.


Image: A Warrior infantry fighting vehicle of the UK army. Photo: copyright Lockheed Martin Corporation.

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