Dana Spicer CTIS to feature in all selected JLTV vehicles

16 October 2012 (Last Updated October 16th, 2012 03:45)

Dana's Spicer central tyre inflation system (CTIS) has been selected for inclusion into all vehicles recently selected for the US Army and Marine Corps Joint Light Vehicle Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) programme.

JLTV variants

Dana's Spicer central tyre inflation system (CTIS) has been selected for inclusion into all vehicles recently selected for the US Army and Marine Corps Joint Light Vehicle Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) programme.

The system will be implemented in Lockheed Martin, Oshkosh, and AM General-built vehicles, which were selected by the US Department of Defense (DoD) for the engineering and manufacturing development (EMD) programme phase in August.

Speaking about the system, Dana Commercial Vehicle Driveline Technologies president Pat D'Eramo said: "In military applications, our CTIS systems have proven to be highly effective in reliably and efficiently transporting service members in the most difficult of environments."

Spicer CTIS has been designed to enhance the vehicle's mobility by enabling operators to adjust tyre pressure to the optimum level from inside the cab, regardless of driving terrain.

"Our CTIS systems have proven to be effective in reliably and efficiently transporting service members in the most difficult of environments."

As well as enabling effective vehicle operation with extremely low tyre pressures, the system also helps operators freeing stuck vehicles and securing troop transportation in challenging conditions.

Spicer CTIS was also present in all seven of the vehicles, which were originally submitted for the multibillion dollar contract in March.

As part of separate $66.3m, $56.4m and $64.5m contracts, Lockheed, Oshkosh and AM General are scheduled to manufacture and deliver 22 prototypes within 12 to 14 months for government analysis and testing.

The JLTV programme is aimed at replacing the US Military's ageing fleet of high-mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicles (HMMWVs), which served in combat for more than 25 years.

Around 50,000 vehicles are expected to be purchased by the army, with options for additional units, while the USMC is planning to acquire 5,500 vehicles.


Image: Lockheed Martin's three JLTV variants during field trails. Photo: courtesy of Lockheed Martin.