Boeing to continue support for US military aircraft

5 February 2015 (Last Updated February 5th, 2015 18:30)

Boeing has received a contract from the US Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) to continue the provision of support services for US military aircraft.

Apache helicopter

Boeing has received a contract from the US Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) to continue the provision of support services for US military aircraft.

Valued at $223m, the performance-based agreement is the second of two received by the company under a five-year deal agreed in September 2014, and covers support for 11 different aircraft, reducing combat logistics support costs and boosting readiness.

Specific aircraft include the AH-64 Apache attack helicopter, F/A-18 Super Hornet, AV-8B Harrier and B-52 Stratofortress, as well as C-17 Globemaster III and associated ground support equipment.

Boeing Tactical Aircraft and Weapons Support vice-president Julie Praiss said: "Warfighters executing their missions rely on their systems being ready when they need them.

"In addition, our customers have said they need greater value in their logistics support. Providing improved performance at lower cost is what Boeing is all about."

"Boeing will incrementally receive multiple contracts during the next five years."

The first $293m contract required Boeing to supply aircraft parts and support the AH-64, AV-8, B-1, B-52, C-17, CH-47, E-3, E-6, F-15, F/A-18 and KC-135 and ground support equipment, enabling the DLA to provide essential logistics support to soldiers more quickly and effectively.

Boeing will incrementally receive multiple contracts during the next five years. In addition, the DLA has a follow-on option, which if exercised would extend the contract by a further five years.

Work is scheduled to be administered from the company's facility in St. Louis, Missouri, US.

The two sides are believed to be collaborating on new ways to streamline processes, enhance performance and improve affordability.


Image: A US military AH-64 Apache attack helicopter. Photo: courtesy of Andre Engels.