US Army Develops New Technology to Identify Biological Agents

20 July 2011 (Last Updated July 20th, 2011 18:30)

Scientists at the US Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) have developed a new way of identifying biological agents. The agents of biological origins identification (ABOID) system has been designed to allow commanders to test and identify biological agents and to help protect s

Scientists at the US Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) have developed a new way of identifying biological agents.

The agents of biological origins identification (ABOID) system has been designed to allow commanders to test and identify biological agents and to help protect soldiers from potential and unknown biological threats.

ECBC former senior scientist Charles Wick said, "This cutting-edge technology enables identification of micro-organisms down to strain level in minutes, rather than hours."

The centre has entered into a licence agreement with Sage-N Research to integrate the system into Sage's existing proteomics platform, Sorcerer, for rapid detection and identification of micro-organisms.

The system has a database of 4,500 unique genomes of bacteria, viruses and fungi.