General Dynamics to deliver IRB systems for Brazilian Army

27 June 2018 (Last Updated June 27th, 2018 12:17)

The Brazilian Army Commission has awarded a contract to General Dynamics European Land Systems for the supply of the latest improved ribbon bridge (IRB) to the service.

General Dynamics to deliver IRB systems for Brazilian Army
The Improved Ribbon Bridge (IRB) system. Credit: © 2018 General Dynamics European Land Systems.

The Brazilian Army Commission has awarded a contract to General Dynamics European Land Systems for the supply of the latest improved ribbon bridge (IRB) to the service.

Under the deal, the company will also be responsible for the provision of trucks, bridge adapter pallets, a bridge erection boat, and integrated logistics support (ILS).

Once delivered, the Brazilian Army can use the new IRBs both as a multi-bay ferry and a floating bridge.

The bridge provides wide wet-gap crossing capabilities for tracked and wheeled combat and tactical vehicles for loads up to MLC80 Tracked/96 Wheeled.

"Already deployed into service with several armed forces across the world, the bridge helps support theatre and peacekeeping operations, in addition to humanitarian and environmental missions."

General Dynamics European Land Systems International Business and Services vice-president Thomas Kauffmann said: “This new acquisition of the IRB demonstrates the high confidence and satisfaction of the Brazilian Army in the performance of our advanced bridge systems.”

The Brazilian Army is currently using the Floating Support Bridge (FSB) provided by the company.

Delivery of the first IRB system to the Brazilian Army is said to be carried out next year.
The IRBs are fully interoperable with the company’s legacy floating bridge systems, including the FSB, the standard ribbon bridge (SRB) and the M3 amphibious bridge and ferry system.

Already deployed into service with several armed forces across the world, the bridge helps support theatre and peacekeeping operations, in addition to humanitarian and environmental missions.

Since 2003, the IRB system has been used by the US Army and the US Marine Corps (USMC) in extensive combat operations.