Canada commits to maintain accuracy of CAF equipment

7 October 2020 (Last Updated October 7th, 2020 17:07)

The Government of Canada has committed to maintaining the accuracy of the Canadian Armed Forces’ (CAF) equipment.

Canada commits to maintain accuracy of CAF equipment
The contract works will help in ensuring that measurement, repair and testing tools used by Canadian Armed Forces are accurate. Credit: U.S. Army Europe.

The Government of Canada has committed to maintaining the accuracy of the Canadian Armed Forces’ (CAF) equipment.

As part of the effort, Canadian Minister of National Defence Harjit S Sajjan announced that a contract was awarded to Pylon Electronics to provide calibration services for the Department of National Defence (DND).

The C$63m ($47.46m) contract carries a five-year term.

Under the contract, the company will support DND’s Quality Engineering Test Establishment (QETE), an entity that provides independent testing, evaluation and verification of equipment to DND and CAF.

The contract works will help in ensuring that measurement, repair and testing tools used by QETE and the CAF are accurate.

Minister Sajjan said: “Our defence policy, ‘Strong, Secure, Engaged’, puts people at the centre of everything we do. By working with industry leaders like Pylon Electronics, we can make sure that the equipment that the members of the Canadian Armed Forces uses are up to the task.

“We will continue to invest in the CAF so that they can do the challenging jobs we ask of them both at home and abroad.”

As agreed, the calibration services will be provided through facilities located across the country.

Every year, around 22,000 out of the 70,000 instruments used by DND and the CAF require calibration.

Minister of National Defence parliamentary secretary Anita Vandenbeld said: “Through this contract to Pylon Electronics, we continue to support 100 good jobs in Ottawa and across Canada so the members of the Canadian Armed Forces have the tools they need.

“Investing in our local industry is more important than ever as we face the effects of this pandemic.”

Meanwhile, Canada has suspended export permits to Turkey after alleged usage of Canadian technology in the military conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh.