Boeing and Saab conduct first test-firing of GLSDB


Boeing and Saab have conducted the first test-firing of the ground launched small diameter bomb (GLSDB) from an undisclosed location.

The trial confirmed that the GLSDB, integrated with Boeing's small diameter bomb I (SDB I) originally developed for use by aircraft and M26 rocket motor technologies for the multiple launch rocket system (MLRS), can withstand a rocket artillery launch without its performance being compromised.

Boeing Weapons and Missile Systems vice-president Beth Kluba said: "GLSDB combines two highly successful, combat-proven systems into an effective ground forces offensive capability.

"GLSDB combines two highly successful, combat-proven systems."

"Boeing and Saab bring together deep knowledge of precision weapon systems and can quickly and cost-effectively deliver GLSDB domestically and around the world."

Last year, the companies signed an agreement to offer GLSDB to current and future rocket artillery users worldwide.

The rocket motor used during the trial was supplied by Nammo.

Saab Dynamics Business Area head Gorgen Johansson said: "Saab and Boeing have a history of successful cooperation that now extends into yet another technology area - precision weapons systems.

"Together, we now offer a new and game-changing capability for the US, as well as the global market."

Weighing 615lb, the GLSDB is low-risk weapon designed to provide a long-range, precision-fire weapon capable of conducting reverse-slope engagements and defeating a range of targets, from hardened facilities to soft-skinned assets.

Capable of launching to an altitude and glide on a selected trajectory, the weapon complements existing ballistic trajectory weapons and provides enhanced capability over current guided MLRS rockets. However, it maintains the SDB I's flight manoeuvrability and accuracy.

Boeing and Saab are currently in talks with a number of customers, DefenseNews reported, citing Saab North America president Michael Andersson and Kluba, who also confirmed that the US Army is exploring the system.