US Army contracts Lockheed Martin for HIMARS launchers

1 September 2020 (Last Updated September 1st, 2020 13:24)

Lockheed Martin has won a contract worth $183m from the US Army to produce high mobility artillery rocket system (HIMARS) launchers and associated hardware.

US Army contracts Lockheed Martin for HIMARS launchers
Lockheed Martin has won a contract from the US Army to produce HIMARS. Credit: Lockheed Martin Corporation.

Lockheed Martin has won a contract worth $183m from the US Army to produce high mobility artillery rocket system (HIMARS) launchers and associated hardware.

Under the deal, the company will be responsible for manufacturing 28 units of the HIMARS.

Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control Precision Fires and Combat Maneuver Systems vice-president Gaylia Campbell said: “The army’s commitment to the HIMARS launcher through 2050 reflects our customers’ confidence in Lockheed Martin’s highly reliable, combat-proven precision strike systems and munitions.

“These new HIMARS launchers will provide unmatched mobile firepower in support of multi-domain operations, and our allies can count on Lockheed Martin’s continued support in maintaining these combat-proven systems.”

Lockheed Martin will manufacture the HIMARS at its Precision Fires Center of Excellence in Camden, Arkansas, US.

Delivery of the launcher and associated equipment is scheduled to commence in 2022.

Once delivered, the launchers will be used by the US Marine Corps and an undisclosed foreign customer.

HIMARS is used by the army to fire Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System (GMLRS) rockets, Army Tactical Missile System (ATACMS) missiles, Precision Strike Missile (PrSM) and Extended-Range GMLRS rockets.

The system comprises a launcher loader module and fire control system installed on a 5t truck chassis, while the three crew members deployed to operate the system are offered extra protection in a specialised armoured cab.

The lightweight mobile launcher HIMARS can be transported on board a C-130 Hercules military transport aircraft and other larger aircraft for rapid deployment.

Last month, Lockheed Martin and MBDA Deutschland submitted an updated proposal to deliver Germany’s future Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) system.