US soldiers undergo training using new electronic warfare technology

22 October 2018 (Last Updated October 22nd, 2018 13:52)

Soldiers from the US Army's Headquarters and Headquarters Company (HHC) 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division brigade are undergoing training using new electronic warfare (EW) technology.

US soldiers undergo training using new electronic warfare technology
US Army Staff sergeant Christopher Morvant works on the Raven Claw computer and Humvee system during training at Zagan, Poland. Credit: US Army / Sgt 1st Class Craig Norton.

Soldiers from the US Army’s Headquarters and Headquarters Company (HHC) 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division brigade are undergoing training using new electronic warfare (EW) technology.

The training initiative is aimed at making ground troops capable of rapidly reacting to electronic and cyber data rather than waiting for information from higher-ranked officers. The EW technology enables a team to forward deploy and respond to enemy frequencies.

As part of the exercise, team members are being trained on operation and integration of EW capabilities, including versatile radio observation and direction (VROD), VROD modular adaptive transmit (VMAX) and Raven Claw.

While VROD and VMAX form a portion of the backpack system that delivers electronic assault capabilities such as signal interception and jamming, Raven Claw can provide on-the-ground planning and management without the need for any network connection.

“Forward deployed soldiers can use both dismounted and mounted systems to act on electromagnetic information as soon as they receive it.”

HHC 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division electronic warfare section in-charge sergeant 1st Class Jerry Wheeler said: “These teams are tied to surveying the battlefield, going out with the scouts and being the lead elements. We’re using it for real-time information.”

Forward deployed soldiers can use both dismounted and mounted systems to act on electromagnetic information as soon as they receive it.

US Army Staff sergeant Benjamin Donahue said: “Having it [EW technology] at this level helps a local commander make more EW-type decisions. If you have it at only the high echelons, you’re waiting on a report to come down later, versus something you can do right now.”

Team members receiving training will use EW technology skills at Combined Resolve XI, a multinational training exercise to be held later this year at the Joint Multinational Readiness Center, Hohenfels Training Area, Germany.