Raytheon to provide aircraft maintenance training to Afghan Air Force

2 August 2019 (Last Updated August 2nd, 2019 15:05)

Raytheon has received a $108m contract from the US Army Contracting Command to provide training to the Afghanistan Air Force in aircraft maintenance.

Raytheon has received a $108m contract from the US Army Contracting Command to provide training to the Afghanistan Air Force in aircraft maintenance.

Under the contract, Raytheon is required to develop a new training programme for the US Army’s Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training and Instrumentation.

The programme is known as Afghanistan Air Force Aircraft Maintenance Training (AMT).

The Army Contracting Command awarded this contract under the Enterprise Training Services Contract (ETSC) vehicle.

Raytheon Intelligence, Information and Services Global Training Solutions vice-president Bob Williams said: “Our training is helping the Afghan military develop into a self-sustaining force.

“The programme will increase the Afghanistan Air Force’s capabilities and help ensure future security.”

The contract covers maintenance training for aircraft in service with the Afghanistan Air Force.

The new training programme will be conducted under the direction of the Combined Security Transition Command-Afghanistan (CSTC-A) and Train, Advise, Assist Command-Air (TAAC-Air).

CSTC-A is a US-led multinational mission aimed at enabling the development of a sustainable, effective and affordable Afghan National Defense Security Forces (ANDSF).

TAAC-Air, on the other hand, is designed to train, advise, and assist Afghan partners to help create a capable and sustainable airforce.

In June last year, Raytheon was selected as one of the contractors for ETSC, which is valued up to $2.4bn over a period of five years.

As part of the multi-award indefinite-delivery indefinite-quantity contract, the company was ordered to provide training services in support of the US Army and its security cooperation mission.

ETSC is designed to provide training services for combatant commands and their training of security cooperation partners, Raytheon stated.