Vyper develops new multi-functional ultra-light combat vehicle for US military

14 January 2015 (Last Updated January 14th, 2015 18:30)

Vyper Adamas has introduced a new lightweight, high-powered, ultra-light combat vehicle (ULCV) for military off-road use.

Vyper Adamas has introduced a new lightweight, high-powered, ultra-light combat vehicle (ULCV) for military off-road use.

Called Viper, the high-speed vehicle features the company's more than 40 years of off-road racing and technology design expertise and can change functionality based on attached mission-specific pod within minutes.

The US Army has long sought a multi-use vehicle that can be adapted for all of its requirements in the battlefield.

"Viper is expected to be delivered to military branches where performance in highly demanding off-road settings is critical."

US Army Capabilities Integration Center (ARCIC) head and training and doctrine command futures chief lieutenant general HR McMaster said the service is exploring concepts for future vehicles that would be lighter and faster, but still strong and lethal.

McMaster said: "Our infantry brigade combat teams can get there fast with low logistics demand and they can work in severely restricted terrain, but they lack mobility and protected firepower.

"The answer is for the army to develop vehicles for select infantry and airborne forces to conduct effective reconnaissance, offensive security operations and move infantry units with a security force."

Developed in collaboration with the military, Viper is expected to be delivered to military branches where performance in highly demanding off-road settings is critical.

Vyper Adamas chief executive officer Nicholas Chapman said: "This relationship shows that racing technology and industrial reliability is obtainable in a COTS form at reasonable cost-effectiveness."

Designed to be sling loaded or driven into a CH47 Chinook helicopter, the vehicle provides greater power, torque and handling capability compared with the Humvee.

It has a smoother suspension and manoeuvrability in tight situations and successfully demonstrated its performance at Fort Bragg in North Carolina, US, in June 2014.

During the test, the vehicle performance far exceeded military expectations and led to it being pushed forward as the prototype to develop for production.