US Army conducts flight test of Northrop Grumman-developed IBCS

18 April 2016 (Last Updated April 18th, 2016 18:30)

The US Army has successfully conducted a dual engagement flight test of the integrated air and missile defence (IAMD) battle command system (IBCS).

The US Army has successfully conducted a dual engagement flight test of the integrated air and missile defence (IAMD) battle command system (IBCS).

During the test, carried out jointly with Northrop Grumman, the IBCS used tracked data from Sentinel and Patriot radars to enable command-and-control (C2) for a Patriot Advanced Capability Three (PAC-3) interceptor.

The test validated the system's ability to identify, track, engage, and defeat targets using sensors and interceptors from different air defence systems, which were operating under IBCS control.

The flight test also included a Marine Corps Tactical Air Operations Module for joint C2 situational awareness.

"This IBCS test demonstrated the benefit of giving warfighters expanded combinations of radars and weapon systems to achieve any-sensor, best-shooter capability."

Northrop Grumman Mission Systems missile defence and protective systems division vice-president and general manager Dan Verwiel said: "This IBCS test demonstrated the benefit of giving warfighters expanded combinations of radars and weapon systems to achieve any-sensor, best-shooter capability.

"Together with the army, we look forward to realising the advances offered by the IBCS open architecture, including taking advantage of sensors that look in all directions to facilitate 360-degree protection for air and missile defence missions."

The defence included battery and battalion IBCS engagement operations centres, a Patriot radar, two Sentinel radars and two PAC-3 launchers connected at the component level to the IBCS network.

Using IBCS mission control software, the engagement operations centre operator ordered the launch of a single PAC-3 interceptor missile to destroy the target.

IBCS replaces seven legacy C2 systems to deliver a single integrated air picture, and provide flexibility for the deployment of smaller force packages.

It allows integration of current and future sensor, weapon, joint C2, and ballistic missile defence systems.