Singapore military orders HeartSine Samaritan PAD 500P defibrillators

12 February 2014 (Last Updated February 12th, 2014 18:30)

HeartSine Technologies has been awarded a multi-million dollar contract for supply of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) to the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF).

HeartSine Technologies has been awarded a multi-million dollar contract for supply of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) to the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF).

Awarded by the Singapore Ministry of Defence (MINDEF), the contract covers supply of around 1,900 HeartSine Samaritan PAD 500P AEDs, majority of which will be installed in communal areas of the military camps.

The remaining systems are expected to be deployed in medical centres or during field training.

"This is our largest contract in Singapore."

HTM Medico chief executive Don Mok said: "Every military camp in Singapore, for all land, air and sea troops, will now have HeartSine defibrillators installed.

"This will ensure that extremely easy to use, life-saving AEDs are always readily available, which is important as any loss of these young citizens is a great loss to our nation."

HeartSine Technologies chief executive Declan O'Mahoney said: "This is a fantastic achievement for HeartSine, reflecting the worldwide recognition and extremely high quality of our defibrillators.

"While this is our largest contract in Singapore, we also have placed HeartSine devices in the Singapore Civil Defence Force, Singapore Parliament and the Ministry of Health."

Selected against all of the major AED brands, HeartSine PAD 500P is a compact, lightweight defibrillator, featuring a unique cardio pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) Advisor that uses an impedance cardiogram (ICG) to assess the effectiveness of the CPR and give the rescuer feedback on compressions.

The MINDEF sought to implement a comprehensive AED programme in wake of increasing number of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) fatalities in army camps, and also keeping in view the tough physical training the civilians undergo during their compulsory two-years of service.

Mr Mok said: "If someone suffers SCA, their chance of survival using Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) is around 5%, but, when combined with the use of a defibrillator can rise to 75%."

Defence Technology