Russian Army to receive fourth Iskander-M brigade set

11 November 2014 (Last Updated November 11th, 2014 18:30)

The Russian Ministry of Defence (MoD) is reportedly set to receive an additional brigade set of Iskander-M tactical missile systems from the Kolomna Machine Building Design Bureau (KBM).

Iskander missile

The Russian Ministry of Defence (MoD) is reportedly set to receive an additional brigade set of Iskander-M tactical missile systems from the Kolomna Machine Building Design Bureau (KBM).

A report seen by Interfax-AVN said that the batch represents the second Iskander-M set supplied this year, and would be delivered to the 92nd missile brigade of the Second Guard Combined-Arms Army of the Central Military District, on 18 November.

"This would be the fourth set supplied in the past two years under a contract between the Defence Ministry and the Kolomna Machine Building Design Bureau," the report said.

"The two-year fulfilment of this contract has confirmed the correctness of the integrated approach proposed by the Kolomna Machine Building Design Bureau.

"Thanks to this, missile brigades will acquire combat-ready armaments, which can immediately start patrolling the borders of our fatherland."

A brigade set of Iskander-M missile systems features 51 vehicles, including 12 launchers, 12 transporter-loaders, 11 command vehicles, 14 support vehicles, one maintenance vehicle and one data processing post, as well as precision-guided missiles, ammunition and training equipment.

"This would be the fourth set supplied in the past two years under a contract between the Defence Ministry and the Kolomna Machine Building Design Bureau."

KBM is working with more than 150 enterprises to ensure the scheduled delivery of component parts to the Russian Army.

The team conducted test runs on the vehicles at the Kapustin Yar range in Astrakhan Oblast, Russia, before integrating them into a single data network.

The Iskander-M is an upgraded version of the Russian Army's 9K720 Iskander mobile-theatre ballistic missile system, which is designed to engage a range of ground targets, including command posts and communications nodes, troops in concentration areas, air and missile defence facilities, and fixed and rotary-wing aircraft at airfields.

Also known as SS-26 Stone, the missile has an operational range of 400km with a potential for extension, and features inertial and optical-guidance systems for improved firing accuracy and an electro-optical seeker for self-homing capabilities.


Image: Iskander missiles on a transport erector launcher at the 2010 Moscow Victory Parade rehearsal. Photo: courtesy of A.Savin.

Defence Technology