Raytheon’s JLENS moves toward operational deployment with US Army

14 August 2012 (Last Updated August 14th, 2012 18:30)

US Army soldiers have completed mission operator training on Raytheon's joint land attack cruise missile defence elevated sensor (JLENS) system, advancing a step toward its operational deployment in the battlefield.

US Army soldiers have completed mission operator training on Raytheon's joint land attack cruise missile defence elevated sensor (JLENS) system, brining it a step nearer operational deployment in the battlefield.

During training, troops practised the operation of JLENS to detect and target incoming cruise missiles, as well as to track ships, cars, trucks and boats.

The soldiers also underwent training in establishing the system and communicating information from JLENS sensors to the US Army, Navy and Air Force.

“Now that the classroom studies and simulation activities are complete, these soldiers are fully prepared to begin structured, on-the-job training on the actual JLENS hardware.”

US Army JLENS product manager Dean Barten said: "Now that the classroom studies and simulation activities are complete, these soldiers are fully prepared to begin structured, on-the-job training on the actual JLENS hardware."

Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems business Global Integrated Sensors vice president David Gulla said the system could be field tested abroad in an effort to validate its effectiveness in safeguarding critical national security assets.

"JLENS tracks a wide range of targets at extremely long ranges providing commanders minutes to identify and respond to incoming threats instead of the handful of seconds provided by current systems," Gulla said.

Equipped with a powerful integrated radar system, the JLENS is an affordable elevated, persistent over-the-horizon sensor system designed to detect, track and engage a broad range of distantly located threats.

The system helps combatant commanders defeat a variety of threats including hostile cruise missiles, low-flying manned and unmanned aircraft, tactical ballistic missiles, large calibre rockets, and moving surface vehicles such as swarming boats, SCUD-launchers, automobiles and tanks.

JLENS features two tethered, 74m aerostats that are networked to mobile mooring stations and a communications and processing group; it is capable of providing 24/7 surveillance coverage for 30 days.