Lockheed’s LRSAV weapon system fires DAGR and Hellfire II missiles

17 June 2014 (Last Updated June 17th, 2014 18:30)

Lockheed Martin’s long-range surveillance and attack vehicle (LRSAV) turreted weapon system has successfully fired Hellfire II and direct attack guided rocket (DAGR) missiles during ground-to-ground tests at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, US.

Lockheed Martin's long-range surveillance and attack vehicle (LRSAV) turreted weapon system has successfully fired Hellfire II and direct attack guided rocket (DAGR) missiles during ground-to-ground tests at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, US.

Both Hellfire II and DAGR missiles, launched by the vehicle-mounted LRSAV system from 6.4km and 3.5km respectively, successfully impacted their targets during tests, which used missile lock-on-before-launch and lock-on-after-launch capabilities to demonstrate LRSAV's flexibility in various engagement scenarios.

"The tests confirm that the LRSAV weapon system is a low-risk solution that can support multiple missions, according to the company."

In addition, a modernised target acquisition designation sight/pilot night vision sensor (M-TADS/PNVS)-equipped AH-64D Apache helicopter was used to remotely designate the short-range target, evaluating LRSAV's cooperative battlefield-engagement capability.

The tests confirm that the LRSAV weapon system is a low-risk solution that can support multiple missions, according to the company.

Designed and built at Lockheed Martin missiles and fire control facilities in Texas, Florida and the UK, the LRSAV is a fully integrated, turreted, ground-vehicle weapon system, which delivers a superior capability to warfighters that enables target engagement from safe standoff distances.

Apart from advanced missile and weapon control system technologies, the system uses a newly developed 15in, spherical, mast-mounted electro-optical/infrared sensor to allow for targeting and employment of missiles from a wide range of surface platforms.

Defence Technology