Lockheed’s anti-munition system demonstrates target engagement capabilities

27 November 2012 (Last Updated November 27th, 2012 18:30)

The Lockheed Martin-built Area Defense Anti-Munitions (ADAM) system has successfully demonstrated its target engagement capabilities during a series of test flights against representative airborne targets.

The Lockheed Martin-built Area Defense Anti-Munitions (ADAM) system has successfully demonstrated its target engagement capabilities during a series of test flights against representative airborne targets.

The system successfully engaged an unmanned aerial system (UAS) target in a simulated flight at a range of 1.5km and also intercepted four small-calibre rocket targets in flight at a range of 2km.

Lockheed Martin Strategic and Missile Defense Systems directed energy systems director Paul Shattuck said the system had been developed using a combination of the company's proven laser beam control architecture and commercial hardware.

“Lockheed Martin has invested in the development of the ADAM system because of the enormous potential effectiveness of high-energy lasers."

"Lockheed Martin has applied its expertise as a laser weapon system integrator to provide a practical and affordable defence against serious threats to military forces and installations," Shattuck added.

Lockheed Martin Strategic and Missile Defense Systems advanced programs vice president Doug Graham said the company would continue to support the transition of directed energy's revolutionary capability to the soldier.

"Lockheed Martin has invested in the development of the ADAM system because of the enormous potential effectiveness of high-energy lasers," Graham said.

The ADAM is a portable, ground-based laser system designed to safeguard military high-value installations including, forward operating bases (FOBs) against a wide range of close-in improvised rocket and unmanned aerial system (UAS) threats.

With a tracking range of more than 5km, the system accurately locates targets in cluttered optical environments, and features a 10kW fibre laser that can destroy targets at up to 2km away.

The modular system can be transported easily and is self-contained to destroy rockets as a standalone system and also engage UAS with an external radar cue.