Lockheed to develop open-architecture controller for US Army’s MAPS programme

1 December 2015 (Last Updated December 1st, 2015 18:30)

Lockheed Martin has secured contracts from the US Army's Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) to continue developing an open-architecture controller for the modular active protection system (MAPS) programme.

Army

Lockheed Martin has secured contracts from the US Army's Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) to continue developing an open-architecture controller for the modular active protection system (MAPS) programme.

The controller will process information from multiple sensor and self-defence systems, which can used for armoured vehicle protection.

Lockheed's open-architecture controller aids autonomous or semi-autonomous detection and defeat of inbound threats.

As part of the MAPS Phase II contract, the company will continue to develop software for a rapid counter-measure capability, which will defend vehicles against incoming threats.

The company's controller will be compliant with MAPS architecture and safety requirements, under the MAPS controller hardware contract.

The firm recently supplied several prototype controllers to TARDEC for evaluation under a previous contract.

Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control, Fire Control/SOF CLSS vice-president Paul Lemmo said: "We are developing a controller that enables the US Army to implement active protection systems that are free of the restrictions imposed by proprietary technologies.

"We are developing a controller that enables the US Army to implement active protection systems."

"Not only does the controller provide ample processing power, but its open-architecture design allows the army to interchange sensors and self-defence systems as technology advances or new threats emerge."

In February 2014, Lockheed Martin and TARDEC successfully demonstrated that fully autonomous convoys could operate in urban environments with several different vehicles.

Unmanned M915 trucks and palletised loading system (PLS) vehicles navigated through hazards and obstacles, including road intersections, oncoming traffic, stalled and passing vehicles, pedestrians, and traffic circles, in urban and rural test areas.


Image: The open-architecture controller will process the information from multiple sensor and self-defence systems, which can used for armoured vehicle protection. Photo: courtesy of Lockheed Martin Corporation.