Libya requests general purpose force training from US

23 January 2014 (Last Updated January 23rd, 2014 18:30)

The US Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) has notified Congress of a potential foreign military sale (FMS) for general purpose force training and associated equipment to Libya.

The US Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) has notified Congress of a potential foreign military sale (FMS) for general purpose force training and associated equipment to Libya.
 
Under the estimated $600m sale, Libya has requested the US for training of a 6,000 to 8,000 person general purpose force.

The package will include services for up to eight years for training, facilities sustainment and improvements, personnel training and training equipment, 637 M4A4 carbines and small arms ammunition, organisational clothing and individual equipment (OCIE), as well as other related elements of logistical and programme support.

Specifically, the basic, collective and advanced training is expected to prove critical for establishment of a professional and disciplined general purpose force, which will be used to safeguard Libyan institutions, facilities and personnel, and also to maintain peace and security within the country.

"The basic, collective and advanced training is expected to prove critical for establishment of a professional and disciplined general purpose force."

The principal contractors for the potential sale, which also contributes to the foreign policy and national security of the US by helping to improve the security of Libya, currently remain classified, but are expected to be determined during the competitive bid process.

As part of the sale, approximately 350 US government and contractor personnel will remain for up to eight years to conduct training at the Novo Selo training site in Bulgaria.

Apart from US, several foreign countries, including Italy, Turkey and the UK are also considering training of Libyan personnel in a bid to build a smaller force capable of providing internal security, as reported by USA Today.

Defence Technology