Indian Army orders CBRN training simulators from Argon

5 February 2013 (Last Updated February 5th, 2013 18:30)

The Indian Army has placed orders with Argon to supply a range of chemical detector simulators, intended to meet current and future training capability requirements.

Chemical_agent_protection

The Indian Army has placed orders with Argon to supply a range of chemical detector simulators, intended to meet current and future training capability requirements.

Under the first major contract from an Indian customer, Argon will deliver CAMSIM, ChemPro100-SIM and GID-3-SIM to the army.

The systems will be delivered for the army's chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) training establishment, the Faculty of Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Protection at the College of Military Engineering, located in Pune, Maharashtra, India.

"The training system allows first responders and CBRN troops to correctly respond to threats."

The requested products form part of a range of chemical warfare agent (CWA) detectors, which are currently operational with the Indian Army.

Argon India sales manager Patrick Hickmott said: "Argon looks forward to further developing its commitment to offering state-of-the-art simulation training solutions that meet the dedicated needs of our clients in facing the global CBRN challenge."

The company has also recently received contracts for the armed forces in the UK, Ireland, Canada and Sweden.

Designed as a training simulator for the Smiths Detection GID-3 CW detector, GID-3-SIM replicates all functions of the real detector, CW alarms and detector faults, as well as Mode 16 output data from RS232 port.

The ChemPro100-SIM has been designed as an interactive simulator for the Environics ChemPro 100/Chempro 100i detector.

Capable of simulating a chemical attack, the training system allows first responders and CBRN troops to correctly respond to threats.

Available in various versions, the CAMSIM simulator can be installed easily and used for CBRN/HazMat exercises and training.


Image: A Swedish Army soldier in a chemical agent protective suit and mask. Photo: courtesy of Johan Elisson.

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