GE delivers COTS rugged systems for US Army’s I-BESS

18 July 2013 (Last Updated July 18th, 2013 18:30)

GE Intelligent Platforms has delivered its commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) rugged systems to the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), which is currently developing an integrated blast effects sensor suite (I-BESS) for the US Army.

I-BESS system

GE Intelligent Platforms has delivered its commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) rugged systems to the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), which is currently developing an integrated blast effects sensor suite (I-BESS) for the US Army.

The company had received a contract from GTRI for supply of 50 systems to serve as the main system for collection of data from IBESS's two major sub-systems, a soldier-worn unit and a vehicle sensor suite.

GE Intelligent Platforms Systems product manager Mac Rothstein said I-BESS is an initiative that will potentially help in enhancing the quality of life of US military personnel.

"For a critical program like this, timeliness and risk elimination were key factors - and GE's COTS rugged systems were able to deliver on both counts,'' Rothstein said.

GE's COTS rugged systems provide a flexible computing platform for mission applications: including unmanned vehicles, ground vehicles and manned aircraft.

"I-BESS is designed to measure the physical environment of an explosion."

Manufactured as part of the Department of Defense's (DoD) Information Analysis Center programme, I-BESS is designed to measure the physical environment of an explosion, collecting data that will help in understanding the effects of explosions on wounded soldiers.

The integrated, time-tagged data captured by the system can later be used by doctors for diagnosis and determination of the best treatment methods for soldiers with concussions or brain injuries, especially traumatic brain injuries.

Currently capable of capturing only environmental data, the system is scheduled to undergo further modifications to enhance its ability to monitor heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen and hydration levels, body temperature and EKG activity to enable integrated blast effect research and collection.


Image: GTRI research scientist and IBESS programme manager Douglas Woods poses with an I-BESS-equipped mannequin. Photo: courtesy of Gary Meek.

Defence Technology