Cassidian supplies components for German Army’s radio systems

14 May 2012 (Last Updated May 14th, 2012 03:45)

Cassidian has delivered equipment required for the German Armed Forces' new software-defined radio communications system, KommSysBw use.

Cassidian has delivered equipment required for the German Armed Forces' new software-defined radio communications system, KommSysBw use.

The delivery follows a multi-million euro contract awarded in August 2009 by the federal office for information management and information technology of the Bundeswehr (IT-AmtBw), to develop broadband modules for a new generation of radio terminals.

Cassidian Military Mission Systems unit head Rolf Wirtz said the company used a new gallium nitride (GaN) based technology to offer an advanced solution for the complex component of the new radio system.

"Secure mobile communications are a necessary precondition for the protection of our soldiers," Wirtz added.

Featuring advanced technologies, the modules facilitate secure data transmission at rates of up to 30 MB/sec over long distances, simultaneously ensuring optimum resistance to jamming.

"Secure mobile communications are a necessary precondition for the protection of our soldiers."

The radio is developed as part of the German miltary's software-defined joint radio system programme, Streitkraftegemeinsame Verbundfahige Funkgerate-Ausstattung (SVFuA), which is aimed at optimising jam-resistant mobile voice and data communications in the future, mainly in missions abroad.

SVFuA provides self-organising, mobile radio networks with highly-secure, wideband voice and data communications, a prerequisite for the army's network-centric operations capability, regardless of the transmission method being used.

Based on the standardised software communications architecture (SCA), the system is also capable of multi-line operation, enabling deployment of a radio network node across multiple frequency bands.

The project is being developed by Hagenuk Marinekommunikation, TDS, Rohde & Schwarz, Telefunken Racoms and Cassidian, which are acting as independent contractors.

Cassidian is already developing similar high frequency components for Nato's multifunctional information distribution system (MIDS) data link programme at its development and production facilities in Unterschleissheim, Ulm and Friedrichshafen, Germany.