BAE Systems to convert US Army’s M88 recovery vehicles fleet

27 April 2016 (Last Updated April 27th, 2016 18:30)

BAE Systems has secured a $109.7m contract to convert M88 recovery vehicles for the US Army.

BAE M88

BAE Systems has secured a $109.7m contract to convert M88 recovery vehicles for the US Army.

The company will convert 36 M88A1 recovery vehicles to the M88A2 heavy equipment recovery combat utility lift evacuation systems (HERCULES) configuration.

Expected to begin in August, work under the contract will be carried out primarily at the company's facilities in York, Pennsylvania, and Aiken, South Carolina, US.

Deliveries will begin in November 2017 and continue through August 2018.

Following conversions, the M88A2s will be able to recover the army's heaviest vehicles, such as tanks, without the assistance of another vehicle.

BAE Systems recovery programmes director John Tile said: "The HERCULES is an integral part of the Army's Armored Brigade Combat Team and is essential to its recovery missions.

"The ability to provide single-vehicle recovery for even the heaviest vehicles in today's fleet increases troop safety and provides significant cost savings to the army."

"The ability to provide single-vehicle recovery for even the heaviest vehicles in today's fleet increases troop safety and provides significant cost savings to the army."

The HERCULES is said to be the only vehicle able to recover the M1 Abrams tank and vehicles used by armoured brigade combat teams in the field.

The M88 has to be upgraded as the combat vehicles become heavier.

Earlier this month, BAE Systems secured a £15.5m contract from the US Department of Defense (DoD) to manufacture and deliver Archerfish mine neutralisers.

Archerfish is a remotely-controlled underwater vehicle equipped with an explosive warhead to destroy sea mines.

It is said to provide significant time and logistical advantages over remotely operated mine-disposal systems.


Image: The conversions allow the M88A2s to recover the US Army's heaviest vehicles, such as tanks, without the assistance of another vehicle. Photo: courtesy of BAE Systems.