BAE system to upgrade Swedish Army’s CV90 combat vehicle fleet

30 March 2016 (Last Updated March 30th, 2016 18:30)

BAE Systems has secured a contract to upgrade the Swedish Army's fleet of CV90 infantry fighting vehicles (IFV).

CV90

BAE Systems has secured a contract to upgrade the Swedish Army's fleet of CV90 infantry fighting vehicles (IFV).

Under a modernisation programme aimed at increasing the vehicles' lifespan, the company will upgrade the survivability, turrets and combat system performance of 262 CV90 armoured combat vehicles.

BAE Systems Weapons Systems managing director Lena Gillström said: "This is a very important programme for BAE Systems and the Swedish Army.

"With this refurbishment and the introduction of the new Battlefield Management System, these vehicles will take a step into the era of digitised defence to strengthen the army's capability to meet future threats."

Work under the modernisation programme is expected to commence without delay followed by deliveries beginning in 2018 and scheduled to continue through 2020.

BAE Systems Hägglunds AB in Örnsköldsvik president Tommy Gustafsson-Rask said: "For the Swedish Army, CV90 has proven its value and capability over the years.

"These vehicles will take a step into the era of digitised defence to strengthen the army's capability to meet future threats."

"CV90 is already in service in seven countries and now, with this refurbishment programme, we'll further extend the CV90's contribution to Sweden's defence."

The enhanced, multi-role CV90 vehicles will provide enhanced protection, survivability, situational awareness, intelligence and interoperability for battlefield and conflict scenarios.

The Swedish Army currently operates a fleet of 509 CV90s.

In addition to Sweden, the vehicles have also been used by Norway, Denmark and Finland, as well as Switzerland and the Netherlands.


Image: BAE Systems will refurbish 262 CV90s under a new contract for Sweden, helping to increase the vehicles' lifespan in support of the Swedish Army capabilities. Photo: BAE Systems.