BAE names local partners for Canadian close combat vehicle programme

15 November 2013 (Last Updated November 15th, 2013 03:30)

BAE Systems has named the local strategic partners for the Canadian Department of National Defence's (DND) multi-billion dollar close combat vehicle (CCV) programme during a planning session in Ottawa, Canada.

BAE Systems has named the local strategic partners for the Canadian Department of National Defence's (DND) multi-billion dollar close combat vehicle (CCV) programme during a planning session in Ottawa, Canada.

Comprising ABB, DEW Engineering, Mil-Quip, Saab Canada, Calian (SED Systems), Thales, Valco Manufacturing, Dumur and Soucy, the partners are scheduled to play a significant role in the programme, if BAE's proposed CV90 infantry fighting vehicle (IFV) is selected.

BAE Systems Canada Group Business Development general manager Caroline Elliott said the company aimed to offer the highest-quality, highest-performing, Canadian solution to DND, and sought local companies that could meet its strict criteria on performance, capabilities and price.

''Our Canadian CCV team was handpicked after an exhaustive industry scan - a cross-Canada tour and review of some 178 companies,'' Elliott said.

"The company aimed to offer the highest-quality, highest-performing, Canadian solution to DND."

The Ottawa planning session brought together representatives from all partner companies to increase their readiness to immediately start work on CCV programme, if CV90 is chosen, to help address Canada's programme delivery and industrial regional benefits (IRB) requirements.

Commenting on session, Elliott said: ''Holding these types of meetings is in-line with our usual, proven practice of engaging and supporting local industry early in a programme so we minimise cost, risk and timescales further down the line.''

Valued at $2bn, the CCV programme seeks to develop and supply high survival medium weight vehicles to help the Canadian Army bridge the gap between the light armoured vehicles III (LAV III) and the Leopard 2 main battle tanks (MBT).

Under the programme, which is also pursued by Nexter Systems and General Dynamics Land Systems Canada (GDLS-C), the army will acquire a total of 108 CCVs with an option for up to 30 additional vehicles for future missions.

Defence Technology