Australian Army orders NIITEK HMDS systems

24 October 2012 (Last Updated October 24th, 2012 03:40)

Non-Intrusive Inspection Technology (NIITEK), a Chemring Group subsidiary, has been awarded a contract for production and supply of its Husky-mounted detection systems (HMDS) to support the Australian Army's route clearance operations in Afghanistan.

Non-Intrusive Inspection Technology (NIITEK), a Chemring Group subsidiary, has been awarded a contract for production and supply of its Husky-mounted detection systems (HMDS) to support the Australian Army's route clearance operations in Afghanistan.

Under the terms of the $6.9m firm fixed price contract, NIITEK will manufacture and deliver ten HMDS, as well as spare parts to the army.

NIITEK president Juan Navarro said: "Since the inception of the HMDS, our commitment has been to provide the world's best explosives and mine detection capability to our allies and coalition partners today and into the future."

"Since the inception of the HMDS, our commitment has been to provide the world's best explosives and mine detection capability to our allies and coalition partners today and into the future."

The HMDS is a multi-panel high-performance system designed to detect surface laid and buried explosive threats, including improvised explosive devices (IEDs), unexploded ordnance (UXO) and weapons caches.

Equipped with four large panels of VISOR 2500 ground penetrating radar (GPR) and an optional metal detector, the ruggedised system is capable of detecting anti-vehicular landmines and other metallic and non-metallic explosive hazards on main supply routes (MSRs) and additional open areas, according to mission requirements.

Additional features include advanced real-time automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithms, remote visualisation (RVIS) systems, a computer and monitoring system, as well as a global positioning system (GPS), which provides the operator with 2D and 3D views of objects buried under the ground.

Since early 2008, the system has helped military personnel detect numerous pressure-plate IEDs prior to detonation in a wide range of road surfaces and soil conditions in Afghanistan.

Deliveries under the contract are scheduled to be complete by the end of November.