Agilite introduces new hands-free stretcher for casualty evacuation

21 March 2013 (Last Updated March 21st, 2013 18:30)

Agilite has introduced a new ultra-lightweight hands-free stretcher, called FlatEvac Fabric Litter, for casualty evacuation missions on the battlefield.

casualty evacuation

Agilite has introduced a new ultra-lightweight hands-free stretcher, called FlatEvac Fabric Litter, for casualty evacuation missions on the battlefield.

Weighing 3.13lb, FlatEvac replaces the existing bulky traditional stretchers with foldable ultralight fabric and four shoulder or hand straps, enabling hands-free casualty transport by either two or four personnel.

The shoulder straps distributes weight more evenly and also keeps the rescuer's hands free, enabling them to operate weapons, call for assistance over the radio and navigate difficult terrain.

Agilite Strategic Development head Elie Isaacson was quoted as saying that the FlatEvac has been primarily designed to enhance the legacy four-man stretcher carrying operations.

Capable of folding up to the size of a carrier bag, with handle, the back-strapping rescue system unfolds to 70cm x 140cm so that the casualty can lie flat on it; it also features a drag option that helps a single person transport the injured to safety.

"The FlatEvac has been primarily designed to enhance the legacy four-man stretcher carrying operations."

Available in tactical black and a range of camouflage netting patterns and priced at $105 per unit, the stretcher has been manufactured using the company's Tactical Tensile (TT) high-density polyester harness webbing and fabric materials.

Currently operational with the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF), US Marines, and British Army, the stretcher can also be used by search-and-rescue teams and outdoor adventurers. It is is also equipped with a built-in bag for storage of the casualty's equipment.

The company has also recently launched a hands-free human backpack, injured personnel carrier (IPC), which uses a simple strapping system to help soldiers carry injured comrades on their backs, similar to a rucksack, away from the battlefield. IPC is also suitable for single-person rescue efforts.


Image: US Army soldiers conduct a simulated casualty evacuation mission at Camp Liberty in Iraq. Photo: Spc Daniel Stoutamire, 2nd BCT, 1st ID Public Affairs.

Defence Technology