Leonardo DRS to demonstrate power system on US Army’s THAAD vehicles

10 August 2018 (Last Updated August 10th, 2018 11:05)

The US Army has selected Leonardo DRS to demonstrate its on-board vehicle power (OBVP) on the service’s Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) missile battery command and control and launcher vehicles.

Leonardo DRS to demonstrate power system on US Army’s THAAD vehicles
Leonardo DRS’ on-board vehicle power (OBVP) system. Credit: © 2018 Leonardo DRS.

The US Army has selected Leonardo DRS to demonstrate its on-board vehicle power (OBVP) on the service’s Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) missile battery command and control and launcher vehicles.

The upgrades to the electrical power system will provide the air defence operators with direct instant access to electrical power from a power train of a THAAD vehicle.

Designed to address mission power requirements of the US Army, the OBVP systems are integrated with the vehicle transmission that can produce up to 55kW of usable electrical power during movement or up to 120kW of usable electrical power when stationary.

The new system can be used to increase battlefield agility, reduce deployment logistics costs and support mission readiness while causing no adverse impact on functionality of the vehicle.

Collaborating with Allison Transmission, Leonardo DRS intends to jointly provide existing OBVP systems based on the Allison 3200 SP transmission and develop an OBVP system for the Allison 4500 SP transmission.

“This proven system will provide our customers with a solution to address the growing electrical power gap affecting all military ground vehicle platforms.”

DRS Land Electronics vice-president and general manager Jerry Hathaway said: “This proven system will provide our customers with a solution to address the growing electrical power gap affecting all military ground vehicle platforms.

“Leonardo DRS and our partner, Allison Transmission, have been long-time believers in OBVP technology. We are very pleased with the leadership of the DoD, specifically the Army TARDEC, in demonstrating technology that can address the ground combat vehicle power gap.”

Work on the project will be carried out at the company facilities in Huntsville, Alabama and Fitchburg, Massachusetts, and work on Allison Transmission will be performed in Indianapolis, Indiana.

The current contract will expand the use of the OBVP technology on to heavy-class platforms such as heavy expanded mobility tactical truck (HEMTT) and medium tactical vehicle replacement (MTVR) vehicles.