General Dynamics to provide improved ribbon bridge for Swedish Army

2 February 2018 (Last Updated February 2nd, 2018 12:36)

The Swedish Defence Materiel Administration (FMV) has awarded a new contract to General Dynamics European Land Systems for the development and delivery of its improved ribbon bridge (IRB) for the Swedish Army.

General Dynamics to provide improved ribbon bridge for Swedish Army
Improved ribbon bridge. Credit: General Dynamics Corporation

The Swedish Defence Materiel Administration (FMV) has awarded a new contract to General Dynamics European Land Systems for the development and delivery of its improved ribbon bridge (IRB) for the Swedish Army.

Capable of being operated both as a multi-bay ferry and a floating bridge, the new IRB offers wide wet gap-crossing capability for loads such as MLC80 tracked 96 wheeled and the Swedish Leopard 2 main battle tank.

With the delivery of the first systems due in 2020, the IRB bridge bays will be transported on and launched from an existing and upgraded multipurpose truck.

“Following several summer and winter trials, the bridge upgrade will help address the new requirements of the army’s vehicle fleet.”

General Dynamics European Land Systems International Business and Services vice-president Dr Thomas Kauffmann said: “We are honoured by this contract award as it reflects the high confidence and satisfaction of the Swedish Army in the performance of our product.

“We have supported the Swedish Armed Forces for more than two decades and look forward to continuing this support in the future.”

The new IRB will be used by the Swedish Army to replace part of its traditional floating support bridge (FSB), which was delivered to the army by General Dynamics European Land Systems Germany.

Following several summer and winter trials, the bridge upgrade will help address the new requirements of the army’s vehicle fleet.

The IRB is fully interoperable with the company’s traditional floating bridge systems, including the FSB, the standard ribbon bridge (SRB) and the M3 amphibious bridge and ferry system.

Currently, the IRB is used to support theatre and peacekeeping operations across the world, in addition to humanitarian and environmental missions.