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May 30, 2018

Australia’s DST to develop electronic warfare capabilities

The Australian Defence Science and Technology (DST), part of the national Department of Defence (DoD), has signed an agreement to develop and prototype advanced electronic warfare capabilities.

The Australian Defence Science and Technology (DST), part of the national Department of Defence (DoD), has signed an agreement to develop and prototype advanced electronic warfare capabilities.

To be developed under an interactive project agreement with Raytheon, the electronic warfare capabilities will support the priorities and programmes of the Australian Defence Force (ADF).

Australia’s chief defence scientist Dr Alex Zelinsky said: “Our ability to build defence capability relies on support from industry to deliver leading-edge innovation and research.

“Scientific organisations alone cannot achieve the needed advances without extensive collaboration with industry and academia.”

"Raytheon’s electronic warfare capability uses focused energy, such as radio waves or laser light, in order to either confuse or disable the electronics of the enemy."

Under the agreement, Raytheon will be responsible for providing the DST with its multi-function receiver exciter system test bench, a control system, and a modelling and simulation environment.

DST will use the multi-function integrated receiver/exciter system (MFIRES) to evolve and test the advanced electronic warfare technologies.

MFIRES is a part of Raytheon’s product family that includes the company’s next-generation jammer mid-band.

Raytheon Electronic Warfare Systems director Doug Marimon said: “Controlling the electromagnetic spectrum is essential to today’s mission success.

“By combining US and Australian strengths, we enhance our ability to deliver decisive EW capabilities in the Pacific and beyond.”

Featuring electronic attack capability, the MFIRES is a radar warning receiver that provides electronic support and protection, and integrates various functions that enable system success across the full electronic warfare mission by using less power, weight and space.

Raytheon’s electronic warfare capability uses focused energy, such as radio waves or laser light, in order to either confuse or disable the electronics of the enemy.

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