US DoD and FDA to speed-up availability of medical products for troops

6 November 2018 (Last Updated November 6th, 2018 11:38)

The US Department of Defense's (DoD) Office of Health Affairs has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for development and assessment of new medical products.

The US Department of Defense’s (DoD) Office of Health Affairs has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for development and assessment of new medical products.

The collaboration intends to promote the efficient development of safe and effective medical products that would help save the lives of US services personnel.

Under the agreement, the organisations will closely collaborate to evaluate the best way to gain access to safe and effective medical products, as well as expedite a review of priority DoD medical requirements.

DoD health readiness policy and oversight defence acting deputy assistant secretary Dr Terry M Rauch said: “Today’s MoU reflects the commitment of the DoD and the FDA to ensure timely access to life-saving medical products for US troops and to continue fostering development of new innovative medical products that can help ensure the operational readiness of American troops.

“This MoU reflects the commitment of the DoD and the FDA to ensure timely access to life-saving medical products for US troops.”

“We look forward to continuing to work with the FDA as we analyse and implement measures to provide the best possible medical products and care to all military personnel, on the battlefield, stationed around the world and at home.”

In addition, the MoU enables the provision of ongoing technical advice that would support the rapid development and manufacturing of medicines for use by the military.

The deal formally establishes the framework for the DoD and FDA to implement the law passed by Congress last year.

The law allowed the FDA to authorise emergency uses of these products to reduce deaths and severity of injuries caused by chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear (CBRN) agents.