Cobham’s Amulet UAS tested during Exercise Autonomous Warrior

12 December 2018 (Last Updated December 12th, 2018 14:33)

Cobham has participated in the British Army's 2018 Army Warfighting Experiment Autonomous Warrior.

Cobham’s Amulet UAS tested during Exercise Autonomous Warrior
A US Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal technician removing the fuse from a mine. Credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc. Derek Gaines.

Cobham has participated in the British Army’s 2018 Army Warfighting Experiment Autonomous Warrior.

The four-week exercise is intended to help enhance the army’s technology and military capability in land environments. The exercise was launched by the UK Government in June.

Autonomous Warrior involved combat trials, experimentation and simulation with prototype unmanned aerial, unmanned ground vehicles and supporting software.

During the exercise, carried out in November and December, Cobham’s Amulet unmanned air system (UAS) was tested by soldiers and engineers in harsh simulated combat environments.

In a statement, Cobham said: “As the exercise now concludes, we’re proud to continue supporting the UK Armed Forces in innovating the next generation of equipment to keep our soldiers from harm.”

Fitted with a ground penetrating radar, Cobham’s covert and remote Amulet UAS is designed to help increase the pace of a minefield breath operation.

“It provides the operator with a map of the threats as and when they are detected using a graphical information system.”

When compared to handheld search, the UAS provides the ability to perform detection of buried landmines, improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and emplaced explosive ordnance from a standoff distance, keeping the soldier from harm’s way.

It provides the operator with a map of the threats as and when they are detected using a graphical information system.

A total of 122 initial product applications were submitted for the Army Warfighting Experiment 2018 programme, which included nearly 50 that were selected for testing and evaluation.

The exercise is the result of the partnership between the British Army, British Royal Navy, Royal Air Force (RAF), UK Ministry of Defence (MoD), Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) and the US Army, as well as approximately 50 industry participants.