Bombardier has been granted a patent for systems and methods to synchrophase aircraft engines. The method involves detecting vibration levels in two engines operating at the same speed, and making momentary changes in the speed of one engine until the vibration level reaches a target level. The changes in speed are made regardless of phase imbalances between the engines. GlobalData’s report on Bombardier gives a 360-degree view of the company including its patenting strategy. Buy the report here.

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According to GlobalData’s company profile on Bombardier, Aircraft environment control system was a key innovation area identified from patents. Bombardier's grant share as of June 2023 was 1%. Grant share is based on the ratio of number of grants to total number of patents.

Method for synchronizing aircraft engines to reduce vibration

Source: United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). Credit: Bombardier Inc

A recently granted patent (Publication Number: US11686256B2) describes a method and system for synchrophasing aircraft engines. The method involves detecting the vibration levels of two aircraft engines operating at the same speed using sensors. The data from the sensors is then received by a controller, which commands momentary changes in the operating speed of the second engine until the vibration level reaches a target level. These changes in speed are not dependent on phase information related to imbalances between the engines. The magnitude of the speed changes is determined by the difference between the sensed vibration level and the target level.

The patent also includes additional claims and features. One claim states that each momentary change in speed of the second engine is an increase in rotational speed. Another claim mentions that the sensed vibration level is a combination of vibrations from both engines. The target vibration level is based on the minimum sensed vibration level associated with both engines. The method also involves inducing beats of a predefined period in the vibration levels by commanding a speed difference between the two engines and determining the target vibration level from the resultant vibration levels. The method can be implemented while the first engine maintains a constant speed.

The system described in the patent includes sensors that detect the vibration levels of the engines and controllers that receive the data from the sensors. The controllers are responsible for commanding the momentary changes in the speed of the second engine until the vibration level reaches the target level. The magnitude of the speed changes is determined by the difference between the sensed vibration level and the target level.

Overall, this patent presents a method and system for synchrophasing aircraft engines, which aims to reduce vibration levels by adjusting the operating speed of one engine based on the vibration levels of both engines. This technology could potentially improve the comfort and performance of aircraft engines, particularly in terms of reducing acoustic noise levels inside the passenger cabin.

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GlobalData Patent Analytics tracks bibliographic data, legal events data, point in time patent ownerships, and backward and forward citations from global patenting offices. Textual analysis and official patent classifications are used to group patents into key thematic areas and link them to specific companies across the world’s largest industries.