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Shturm Self-Propelled Anti-Tank Guided Missile System, Russia




Key Data


Shturm self-propelled anti-tank guided missile system

The Shturm-S Self Propelled Anti-Tank Guided Missile System, designated 9K114, is a multi-purpose tracked armoured vehicle, model MT-LS, armed with a semi-automatic command to line-of-sight (SACLOS) anti-tank missile. The Shturm (Storm) missile system is in production at the Design Bureau of Machine Building.

The missile entered service first with the Russian Army, and was later delivered to Armenia, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, the Czech Republic, Georgia, Indonesia, Poland, Slovakia and Ukraine.

Shturm anti-tank guided missile system

The system engages moving and stationary armoured targets, such as modern tanks and infantry combat vehicles; anti-tank missiles; air defence missiles; hardened targets and field fortifications such as pillboxes, concrete and logged emplacements; and slow speed low flying air targets such as helicopters.

The Shturm-S system is a self propelled, automatically loaded launcher, which operates in direct visibility conditions. The system can fire while stationary, on short halts and while afloat.

An airborne version of the missile system, Shturm-V, has been developed to equip helicopters such as the Mi-24 and the Ka-29. Up to eight missiles can be carried. A shipborne version consists of a launcher for six Ataka missiles with stabilised optical sight.

The missile entered service first with the Russian Army, and was later delivered to Armenia, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, the Czech Republic, Georgia, Indonesia, Poland, Slovakia and Ukraine.

Schturm missile system development

"The missile entered service first with the Russian Army."

Shturm was developed by the Design Bureau of Machine-Building in Kolomna. Production commenced in 1967 and tests were completed in 1974. The missile entered service in 1976. It is considered closest to the AGM-114 Hellfire missile.

Schturm missile system

The missile uses a semi-automatic radio-command guidance system, which is highly robust against hostile jamming. The radio guidance system is encoded and the pulsed infrared tracking signal provides protection against active jamming. The Shturm-S missile is outfitted with the Pyl software programme that ensures the missile proceeds on an overfly trajectory until it approaches the target, allowing the gunner to acquire and maintain tracking on the target in limited visibility conditions.

The vehicle carries twelve missile rounds and can prepare to fire in 15s. The rate of fire is 3 to 4 rounds per minute and reloading is automatic. The system can engage airborne targets with approach speeds to 80km/h and cross speeds to 60km/h.

"The missile uses a semi-automatic radio-command guidance system."

The missile system comprises the combat systems, maintenance equipment and training aids. The maintenance equipment comprises two test vehicles, one for maintenance of the guidance and control systems of the missile carrier and the other a test vehicle for missile maintenance.

An integrated logistics support service provides technical support and training in maintenance, repair and operations. Training aids include simulators and practice dummy missiles.

Shturm missile

The Shturm missile, which carries the Russian designation 9M114 and is known by the NATO designation AT-6 Spiral, is a 130mm calibre anti-tank missile with a range of 400-5,000m. The monoblock, shaped charge, blast-type warhead provides an armour penetration of 560mm. The missile approaches the target with a speed of 400m/s.

Ataka missile

The Ataka missile, which carries the Russian designation 9M120 and NATO designation AT-9, is an upgraded version of the Shturm missile. It is fired from existing Shturm launch vehicles. The Ataka has a longer range of 6,000m and is slightly heavier.

The Ataka missile is an upgraded version of the Shturm missile."

Warhead options include a tandem shaped-charge HEAT (high explosive anti-tank) warhead for deployment against advanced main battle tanks provided with explosive reactive armour (ERA), a blast warhead to defeat light armoured vehicles, field fortifications and small ships and a rod warhead to engage helicopters and other air targets. The Ataka missile also equips the Mi-28N combat helicopter.

Shturm-S launch vehicle The Shturm-S launch vehicle.
Diagram of the Shturm-S launch vehicle internal workings System diagram of the launch vehicle.
130mm missile used by the Shturm system The Shturm 130mm missile.
Cross section of the Shaped charged warhead Shturm system uses Shaped charged warhead (left) and blast warhead (right).
Diagram of the Shturm missile flight trajectory The Shturm missile flight trajectory.
Ataka missile and launch tube featured in the Shturm system The Ataka missile and launch tube.
Ataka missile warheads which the Shturm system uses The Ataka missile warheads.