US Army validates use of MUOS network and AN/PRC-155 radios for operations


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The US Army and Navy have successfully demonstrated the AN/PRC-155 mobile user objective system (MUOS) manpack radios as part of the US Army, Pacific Command (USARPAC) exercise.

The radios, which had been upgraded by General Dynamics (GD), provide voice and data communications using the Lockheed Martin-built MUOS communications network in the Pacific.

US Army Tactical Radios project manager colonel James P. Ross said: "As the army focuses more on the Pacific theatre, it is critical for soldiers in that region to be able to communicate back to land when they are travelling thousands of miles at sea.

"The manpack radio and MUOS waveform, along with joint battle command-platform (JBC-P), enable soldiers to not only share enroute mission command information, but to also know where friendly and enemy forces are located."

Equipped with a manpack radio and vehicle-on-the-move antenna, a logistics supply vessel (LSV) travelled between Oahu and Hawaii transporting military supplies from the 8th Theater Sustainment Command (TSC) to the 25th ID.

"It is critical for soldiers in that region to be able to communicate back to land when they are travelling thousands of miles at sea."

The US Army installed the manpack radio at five locations to enable effective communication from the LSV back to land.

In March 2015, GD was awarded a contract to upgrade the MUOS waveform for the US Army's AN/PRC-155 MUOS-manpack radios.

The $13m contract covered the waveform's integration into PRC-155 radios and radio / waveform testing, as well as field support and soldier training to enhance communications across the MUOS network.

Expected to achieve global communications coverage this year, the MUOS system will deliver high-speed voice and data communications and feature ten times the capacity of the military's existing ultra-high-frequency satellite communications.


Image: A logistics supply vessel (LSV) transporting military equipment and supplies during the US Army, Pacific Command (USARPAC) exercise. Photo: courtesy of Bill Cress/US Army.