US Army to develop advanced radar technology


APCN Radar

The US Army Materiel Command's Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC) is working on developing adaptable, secure radar technology.

Designated the advanced pulse compression noise (APCN), the new noise-encrypted radar waveform can be programmed in real-time to optimise radar performance.

CERDEC I2WD Radar Division research scientist Dr Mark Govoni said: "Encrypting our radar waveforms limits the likelihood for adversaries to intercept and exploit our emissions. Programming the waveform in real-time takes this capability even further, and ensures operational effectiveness."

"Given the prevalence of software-defined capabilities, it's totally conceivable to consider this type of technology as an alternative to what's currently used with some of the more critical communication networks like GPS and emergency broadcasting."

"It's totally conceivable to consider this type of technology as an alternative to what's currently used."

The new technology aims to preserve radar system performance during attacks and in high-traffic radio frequency environments.

The research centre is also looking at potential applications of the new technology for law enforcement agencies, besides conducting additional experiments with highly developed radar waveforms.

CERDEC Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate director Dr Paul Zablocky said: "The battlespace is continually evolving, and with that, comes the need to change the way we think about radar design.

"Techniques such as real-time re-programmable waveform synthesis and low probability of intercept / low probability of detection (LPI/LPD) provide added capability that will address the emerging electromagnetic spectrum challenges our soldiers are likely to face in the future."


Image: CERDEC is developing a more adaptable, secure radar technology that can be programmed in real-time to allow soldiers to optimise radar performance in the field. Photo: courtesy of US Army.