Lockheed to launch new radar technology demonstrator


Lockheed Martin is to launch a new radar technology demonstrator that can be used to replace the aging MPQ-65 radar used by the Patriot missile defence system.

The launch of the active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar for engagement and surveillance (ARES) will be held at the annual Space & Missile Defense Symposium in Huntsville, Alabama, US.

The demonstrator is a full-scale prototype of the air and missile defence radar technology to support a 360° capable sensor that will be used by the US Army to address current and emerging air and ballistic missile threats.

Lockheed Martin next-generation radar systems director Mark Mekker said: "Our solution for the US army's new air and missile defence sensor is not a new-start programme. It's a combination of technology maturation over several years and includes capability leveraged from our current development programmes and battlefield-proven radars.

"We rely heavily on our modern radar systems such as the Q-53 and the long-range discrimination radar to rapidly bring low-risk, proven technology to the warfighter."

“We rely heavily on our modern radar systems such as the Q-53 and the long-range discrimination radar to rapidly bring low-risk, proven technology to the warfighter.”

The AESA technology uses gallium nitride (GaN) transmitter technology and advanced signal processing techniques, such as 360° sensor / fire control algorithms based on advanced threat sets.

These technologies and concepts have been fully integrated into both demonstration and production systems resulting in the industry's first fielded-ground based radars with GaN technology, Lockheed stated.

The AESA technology is also being used in the AN/TP/Q-53 radar system, which Lockheed Martin designed, developed and delivered to the army on an urgent need timeline in less than 36 months.


Image: Lockheed Martin’s radar technology demonstrator is being developed to serve as the next-generation sensor specifically designed to operate within the US Army Integrated Air & Missile Defense (IAMD) framework. Photo: courtesy of Lockheed Martin.