ITT awards US Army's SENVGs subcontract to eMagin


ITT Exelis has awarded a subcontract to eMagin for the supply of initial production volumes of display beam combiner assembly (DBCA) for the US Army's spiral enhanced night vision goggles (SENVGs).

The $3.6m award is a part of the original $49.5m contract secured by Exelis from the army in May for SENVGs deliveries and also includes the supply of eMagin's OLED-XL full colour microdisplays.

eMagin president and chief executive officer Andrew Sculley said that the low-power, high contrast, OLED microdisplays would help reduce the power requirements of the SENVG.

"This is an important award for eMagin as it proves the value of the low power, high contrast and wide temperature operational advantages of our active matrix OLED technology for the US Army's night vision initiatives," he said.

“This is an important award for eMagin as it proves the value of the low power, high contrast and wide temperature operational advantages of our active matrix OLED technology for the US Army's night vision initiatives."

Developed from the company's new OLED-XL technology, the OLED-XL microdisplays feature significant improvements in terms of lightning, operational lifetime and reliability, and require no additional power consumption.

The SENVG is an improved version of the enhanced night vision goggle (ENVG), designed to provide soldiers with an ability to detect and identify potential threats, irrespective of the weather or environmental conditions in the battlefield.

Featuring an image intensified tube and infrared micro-bolometer, the goggles are also capable of accommodating further enhancements for the army's future network integration processes.

As part of the $49.5m contract, ITT will supply more than 3,800 SENVGs to provide the US Army soldiers with enhanced situational awareness during complex operations.

Deliveries under the contract are scheduled to start from the middle of the year and will run through tuntil mid-2013.

The company has delivered more than 9,000 ENVGs, with an additional 3,600 devices under contracts to the US Army in 2005 and 2009 respectively.