US Army completes test of GBSAA radar-based system for UAS

15 May 2016 (Last Updated May 15th, 2016 18:30)

The US Army has tested the Ground Based Sense And Avoid (GBSAA) application, which will allow unmanned aerial systems (UAS) to fly within the National Airspace System (NAS).

GBSAA

The US Army has tested the Ground Based Sense And Avoid (GBSAA) application, which will allow unmanned aerial systems (UAS) to fly within the National Airspace System (NAS).

The testing was conducted at Dugway Proving Ground in Utah by flying two Shadow UAS vehicles.

The GBSAA system meets federal requirements and eliminates the requirement of a chase plane or ground observer for UAS flights.

It displays other aircraft near the unmanned craft and notifies the operator of potential hazards.

US Army unmanned aircraft systems of Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, test lead John Innes said: "Today, there is a growing list of UAS units in the states, returned from combat deployments, which need to safely maintain their skills.

"There is a growing list of UAS units in the states, returned from combat deployments, which need to safely maintain their skills."

"The GBSAA will provide that ability to fly within the National Airspace System."

The GBSAA's traffic display will receive data about system health and aircraft positions from ground-based radar and on-board aircraft transmitters.

Information from three separate radars is continuously compared to aircraft data to ensure accuracy.

The traffic display will be monitored by a ground-based operator.

The ground-based observatory (GBO) will be notified about potential aircraft conflicts by a separate alert display. The GBO communicates directly with the aircraft operator.

The army will field GBSAA at five major installations in the US.

The US Marines and Air Force are also interested in deploying the system at one of their stateside bases.


Image: The Ground Based Sense And Avoid system will allow military unmanned aircraft to navigate within the National Airspace System. Photo: courtesy of Al Vogel.