US Army ARDEC engineers launch new app to research labs across DoD

29 October 2015 (Last Updated October 29th, 2015 18:30)

The US Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) have launched a new mobile app, which is designed to allow users to research laboratories across the Department of Defense (DoD).

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The US Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) have launched a new mobile app, which is designed to allow users to research laboratories across the Department of Defense (DoD).

The Defense Laboratory Enterprise eSmartbook app contains facts and media about each laboratory, as well as an RSS news feed that pulls science and technology articles from across the Defense Laboratory Enterprise.

Developed by software engineers at ARDEC, the app was designed in its armament software engineering centre (SEC) in coordination with the US Assistant Secretary of Defense (Research and Engineering) Laboratory Office.

"The app can be updated over the air and bring in news stories from news feeds across the DoD.”

The app is available for the public to download on both Apple and Android devices.

Armament SEC associate for business planning and development Dr Bernard Reger said: "We approached the Defense Laboratory Office and suggested to create a mobile application. It can be updated over the air and bring in news stories from news feeds across the DoD."

The new app can be used by allies to foster collaboration, and is expected to facilitate transparency and knowledge sharing throughout the US DoD, the government and the general public.

The armament SEC is also involved in supporting programmes ranging from crew-served weapons to networked munitions to direct-fire weapon systems.

It is currently working with the US Army's chief information officer (CIO), G-6 and the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), to determine if apps are secure before making them available.

Reger added: "We understand how to do that for traditional army systems very well. When it comes to quickly developing an app and releasing it to the warfighter, there's an extra risk. We have to figure out how to secure those apps."


Image: The Defense Laboratory Enterprise eSmartbook application is open to the public and available on both Apple and Android devices. Photo: courtesy of the US Army.