UK MoD contracts CGI to support FC BISA and FCA systems

30 March 2015 (Last Updated March 30th, 2015 18:30)

The UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) has awarded a contract to CGI to provide ongoing support services for the fire control battlefield information system application (FC BISA) and the fire control application (FCA) system.

The UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) has awarded a contract to CGI to provide ongoing support services for the fire control battlefield information system application (FC BISA) and the fire control application (FCA) system.

CGI UK space, defence, national and cybersecurity vice-president Steve Smart said: "This support service contract will enable the MoD to train and operate effectively, supported by CGI's deep technical expertise and domain knowledge.

"The contract can be extended to provide enhanced support for operational deployments and capability enhancements and will strengthen our secure application development, support and hosting expertise and offerings."

UK MoD project manager Daniel James said: "The award of this contract and our close working relationship with CGI enables the new FCA system to be fielded to the army during 2015, This will deliver benefits including a 50% size and weight saving as well as the latest version of the FCA software, improving both safety and accuracy over its predecessor."

"This support service contract will enable the MOD to train and operate effectively, supported by CGI's deep technical expertise."

The FC BISA is a distributed command and control application designed to help the UK artillery and infantry provide accurate and effective indirect fire support to the army during combat missions.

The application enables commanders at all levels to prepare, plan and execute fire missions, while allowing users to control information between operational cells or automatically move between them.

The comprehensive activity logs can be maintained for after action review.

Developed by CGI, both FC BISA and FCA applications automate several operational functions to improve tempo, safety and accuracy, and are a critical part of a long-term programme to upgrade indirect fire support systems.